Deep Tissue Massage


What is Deep Tissue Massage?

Deep Tissue Massage uses more pressure than most other forms of massage since it aims to stretch and loosen muscles which need attention or which have sustained injury.

Deep Tissue Massage focuses on the deeper layers of muscle tissue. It helps to break up and eliminate adhesions and scar tissue, releasing deeply-held patterns of tension, removing toxins, while relaxing and soothing the muscle. It is both corrective and therapeutic.


How does it work?

Deep Tissue Massage aims to release the chronic patterns of muscle tension in the body through slow strokes and deep pressure on the contracted areas, either following or going across the fibres of the muscles, tendons and fascia. Whilst utilising Holistic Massage techniques which have a relaxing effect on the body, Deep tissue massage will include deeper work on more specific areas and may cause some soreness during or right after the massage. However, you should feel better than ever within a day or two.


How can it help you?

Unlike Swedish massage therapy, which is used for relaxation, deep tissue massage usually focuses on a specific problem, such as:

  • Chronic pain
  • Limited mobility
  • Recovery from injuries (e.g. whiplash, falls, sports injury)
  • Repetitive strain injuries
  • Postural problems
  • Ostearthritis pain
  • Muscle tension or spasm
  • Back pain
  • Inflammatory conditions such as arthritis and tendinitis
  • Stress relief and stress-related conditions
  • Muscle and related conditions such as spasms, strains and sprains

Massage therapy relieves stress. It is thought to help the body's stress response by lowering levels of hormones such as cortisol.

In addition to the benefits listed above, massage can: promote general wellbeing and relaxation, whilst boosting the circulatory and immune systems to benefit blood pressure, circulation, muscle tone, digestion and skin tone.


A Typical Deep Tissue Massage Session

A typical Deep Tissue Massage at the Westoe Practice will take approximately 30 - 90 minutes, depending on whether it is a full body or back massage.

Back massage can be 30 minutes, 60 minutes, or 90 minutes, and includes the neck and shoulders. A full-body massage lasts 60 minutes and includes upper chest, face and scalp.

Your massage will begin with a brief consultation and review of symptoms, medical history, and lifestyle.

Massage therapists may use fingertips, knuckles, hands, elbows, and forearms during the deep tissue massage. You may be asked to breathe deeply as the massage therapist works on certain tense areas.

It is important to drink plenty of water after the massage to flush metabolic waste from the tissues.

Two or three treatments are often sufficient to achieve lasting relief from many conditions, although further treatments may sometimes be required.

Clients are encouraged to return occasionally for maintenance treatments.


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Our massage therapists are trained to respect your privacy at all times and will use a towel technique to ensure you feel comfortable throughout the session. You will be given privacy to undress to your underwear and you will be covered with a towel at all times except the area being worked on.
Make yourself comfortable. If your therapist wants you to adjust your position, she or he will either move you or will ask you to move what is needed. Otherwise, change your position anytime to make yourself more comfortable. Many people close their eyes and relax completely during a session; others prefer to talk. It's up to you. It is your massage, and whatever feels natural to you is the best way to relax. Do not hesitate to ask questions at any time.
Massage is not recommended for certain people:
  • People with infectious skin disease, rash, or open wounds
  • Immediately after surgery
  • Immediately after chemotherapy or radiation, unless recommended by your doctor
  • People prone to blood clots. There is a risk of blood clots being dislodged. If you have heart disease, check with your doctor before having a massage
  • Pregnant women should check with their doctor first if they are considering getting a massage. Massage in pregnant women should be done by massage therapists who are certified in pregnancy massage.
  • Massage should not be done directly over bruises, inflamed skin, unhealed wounds, tumors, abdominal hernia, or areas of recent fractures.